Academic Programs

Capstone courses

 

Advertising and Public Relations

In this capstone experience, students apply concepts and skills from earlier classes to develop a campaign plan for a client organization. Activities include conducting background and audience research; developing realistic objectives, strategies, tactics, and evaluation plans; producing a portfolio of supporting materials; and pitching the campaign to the client. Previously offered as MEJO 434.

 

The course combines a development workshop with a professional industry project, giving students unprecedented access to working creatives, industry trendsetters, and decision makers. In Workroom students will think, write, and execute their creative ideas.

 

The course combines a development workshop with a professional industry project, giving you unprecedented access to working creatives, industry trendsetters and decision makers. In Workroom you will not simply think and write about your creative ideas, instead, this class is completely focused on execution.

 

The course will focus on the changing economics affecting 21st century news organizations and the economic drivers of other content providers such as music companies, the film industry, online aggregators and commerce sites for lessons that can be applied across industry segments. Previously offered as MEJO 551.

During a time of fast-paced technological innovation, this course examines the critical strategic choices facing media executives. Students will observe and research a media company that is making the transition, as well as produce a case study on that effort. Previously offered as MEJO 552.

This course provides the practical knowledge and insights required to establish digital advertising and marketing objectives and strategies, properly select the earned and paid media platforms, and monitor and measure the results of those efforts. Previously offered as MEJO 470.

 

Social marketing is the application of marketing concepts and practices to bring about behavior change for a social good. This course is designed as a service-learning course and fulfills the experiential education requirement.

 

Planning and executing advertising campaigns; types and methods of advertising research; the economic function of advertising in society. Previously offered as MEJO 473.

 

Courses on special topics in advertising with subjects and instructors varying each semester. Repeat rules for 690: May be repeated for credit; may be repeated in the same term for different topics; 9 total credits. 3 total completions. Topic: Advanced Advertising Campaign Planning

 

Permission of the instructor. Required of all students reading for honors in journalism.

 

Permission of the instructor. Required of all students reading for honors in journalism.

 

 
Journalism

 

Media Hub hosts students from various concentrations at the MJ-school to work together to find, produce and market integrated multimedia stories with state, regional and, at times, national appeal. Each team has a representative from news, radio, TV, visual communication and strategic communication.

 

There are more than 100 publicly traded companies in North Carolina, but many of them — particularly the small, entrepreneurial ones — go uncovered by the media in the state. This program provides breaking news about North Carolina public companies — and some private companies — based on their Securities and Exchange Commission filings. We’ll primarily focus on the ones that don’t get the attention of the larger media. 

 

Learn how to oversee and manage a business news wire, including distribution of content to media organizations, managing an email newsletter and handling social media.

The course will focus on the changing economics affecting 21st century news organizations and the economic drivers of other content providers such as music companies, the film industry, online aggregators and commerce sites for lessons that can be applied across industry segments. Previously offered as MEJO 551.

During a time of fast-paced technological innovation, this course examines the critical strategic choices facing media executives. Students will observe and research a media company that is making the transition, as well as produce a case study on that effort. Previously offered as MEJO 552.

Instruction and practice in planning, writing, and editing copy for magazines. Previously offered as MEJO 456.

 

Students study the documentary tradition and produce stories within the social documentary genre of photojournalism. Students choose a relevant social issue and create a multimedia Web site featuring long-form documentary storytelling. Previously offered as MEJO 481.

 

Detailed study of page layout and graphics techniques in magazines. Previously offered as MEJO 483.

 

Permission of the instructor. Required of all students reading for honors in journalism.

 

Permission of the instructor. Required of all students reading for honors in journalism.

 

 

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Certificate programs

Graduates of the Business Journalism Certificate program have gone onto jobs at The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Bloomberg News, Reuters and other business media, as well as jobs in corporate communications.  The certificate allows students to demonstrate a specific knowledge beyond the skills and concepts taught in the journalism area of study.

The certificate in business journalism is offered for students interested in a career in business reporting or editing for the media as well as students interested in careers in corporate communication. Students must complete three of the following five courses: "MEJO 541 Economics Reporting," "MEJO 542 Business Reporting," "MEJO 550 Business and the Media," “MEJO 630 Business News Wire" and “MEJO 631 Business Journalism Management” with at least a C grade in each course.

The certificate is offered to undergraduate majors admitted to the Hussman school. If space is available, other students may take the classes and are eligible for the certificate.

Students apply in the fall. More information on how to apply will be available in August. For questions, please email HussmanHub@unc.edu.

The certificate in health communication and marketing signifies a concentration of three or more courses in the health communication field of study, and is noted on your transcript. The health communication certificate is offered for students within and outside of the Hussman School of Journalism and Media interested in a career in the healthcare industry.

What does that mean for you as strategic communicators? It means your skill set is in demand by hospitals, pharmaceutical companies, healthcare advertising or PR agencies, insurance companies, non-profit organizations and more.

You’ll learn about the healthcare sector, explore the patient journey, map stakeholders and influencers, and get hands-on experience with marketing communications that can help people lead healthier lives.

Students accepted into the certificate program will be matched with an internship opportunity the summer before their senior year.

Students must complete three courses (nine credit hours) to receive the certificate, which include:

MEJO 469: Health Communication and Marketing

  • Learn how skill sets apply to healthcare sector (e.g., pharma, hospital, provider, consumer health; government; non-profit)
  • Understand today’s healthcare consumer and the varying interests and preferred channels across audience segments
  • Map stakeholders and influencers, how they interact and how communications can reach them (e.g., patient, caregiver, provider, payer, policymaker, advocate, media)

 

MEJO 490.2: Behavioral Science of Health Communication (course number will change to MEJO 569 starting in 2023-24)

  • Learn the science behind patient and provider motivations to change and to resist change
  • Analyze the difficulties and potential to leverage important differences versus common goals/needs across audience segments
  • Workshop communication strategies and solutions to help patients and providers overcome resistance, navigate complexities and make better decisions

 

Health Communication Capstone

  • Experience working with a company/organization from the healthcare sector in a semester-long project
  • Apply concepts/practices to research, develop and implement a plan addressing a real-world healthcare concern (e.g., disease awareness, product promotion, hospital brand/services promotion, patient compliance)
  • Receive helpful feedback from the client and a connection for future internships and employment

 

Students interested in applying to the program should contact Hugh Morton Distinguished Professor Heidi Hennink-Kaminski at h2kamins@email.unc.edu.

Launched in 2002 with a $1 million anonymous donation, the Sports Communication Certificate program provides courses about sports and the media, offers internships and scholarships for students, and brings visiting lecturers to the school.

The new world of sports

The best place to see the new world of communication may be the sports field. It encompasses some of the best in journalism, broadcasting, electronic communication, marketing, advertising, public relations, visual communication and new media.

Sports in America involve more than $200 billion in annual spending and touch every professional aspect of media. The leading sports in the United States are followed by 85 percent of the U.S. population, and the average individual follows five different leagues. Sports affect society in myriad ways, from tourism to retailing to equipment to medicine to media.

Sports also serve as a stage for society's most important social issues. Racial integration in the United States made major advances through the popularity of track star Jesse Owens, boxer Joe Louis and baseball player Jackie Robinson. Today, the global celebrity of Michael Jordan and Tiger Woods is a statement of progress and a testament to the power of sports to serve as a common ground for the most significant issues of our times. Similarly, the transformation of women's rights was led by tennis player Billie Jean King. At the time of King's famous match against Bobby Riggs in 1973, just one in 27 women (about 4 percent) participated in athletics. Today, the number is approaching 40 percent, and women's events sell more Olympic tickets than those of men.

Sports communication at the school

The school has long realized the growing importance of sports communication. With that in mind, the school in 2002 launched a Sports Communication Program, headed by professor John Sweeney. Funded by a $1 million anonymous grant, the program provides courses about sports and the media, offers internships and scholarships for students, and brings visiting lecturers to the school.

There is no such sports communication program in the United States, and UNC is the perfect site. Today, former Carolina athletes are on the courts of the National Basketball Association and the fields of the National Football League and Major League Baseball. Coaches and executives with Carolina connections are found in major professional sports leagues, as well as collegiate athletic departments and conference offices. And school graduates cover the careers of these sports professionals for newspapers, magazines, radio and television.

The Sports Communication Program brings the revolutionary commercial world of sports to students, while allowing them to confront the extraordinary changes occurring in sports. This knowledge will assist them in the pursuit of competitive jobs in the sports industry and give them a unique perspective on many of the fundamental dilemmas of our time.

The Sports Communication Program is designed to accommodate students across specializations and areas of study. It aims to lead the nation in educating young practitioners about important issues of sports in the United States and beyond.

Applying to the program

A certificate, a concentration of three or more courses in a related field of study, is noted on a student's transcript. A limited number of students will be admitted into the program and will be guaranteed a seat in each of the three required courses: "MEJO 376: Sports Marketing and Advertising," "MEJO 377: Sports Communication" and "MEJO 476: Ethical Issues and Sports Communication." Students not admitted are still welcome to take the sports communication courses. They may also complete the certificate program. The formal admission simply gives admitted students priority getting into the classes.

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For questions, contact Director of Advertising and Public Relations John Sweeney.

Diversity programs

The UNC Hussman School of Journalism and Media is home to renowned programs to promote diversity and inclusion in the industry, open to undergraduate students nationwide

 

Bloomberg-UNC-Berkeley Business Journalism Diversity Program

Through the Bloomberg-UNC-Berkeley Business Journalism Diversity Program, students will have the opportunity to join one of two week-long programs that will show how business journalists report on what's most at stake in the economy, global stock and bond markets, government regulations and the job market. One program will be at the UNC Hussman School of Journalism and Media and one at the Graduate School of Journalism at UC Berkeley.

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CBC-UNC Diversity Fellowship Program

The CBC-UNC Diversity Fellowship Program is an intensive hands-on workshop led by professionals at WRAL-TV in Raleigh, North Carolina, and UNC journalism faculty. It is geared toward college seniors or graduate students finishing their programs and pursuing broadcast careers.

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Other disciplines

Undergraduate students can take a deeper dive through the following disciplines and alternative major options.
 

Environment and science communication dual-degree program

This dual-degree program is a unique partnership between the Hussman School and the Curriculum for Environment and Ecology, with support from Honors Carolina, and is designed to be completed in five years. Through the program, students earn a bachelor of arts in environmental studies and a master of arts in media and communication.

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Honors program

An honors program is available to students who have demonstrated their ability to perform distinguished work. Students are eligible to graduate with honors if they have a 3.5 GPA at the end of their junior year complete an acceptable honors thesis in their senior year. Students with outstanding theses and cumulative 3.7+ GPAs may graduate with highest honors.

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